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Posted on Friday, May 11th, 2012

Getting your cat to a healthy weight

Over a long winter, you may begin to notice your waistline expanding from a lack of activity, but if you’re not up and moving, there’s a good chance that your pet is doing the same. For cat owners, weight gain is a huge problem that can directly affect cat wellness and can lead to a rash of ailments such as diabetes, joint issues and can inhibit your cats quality of life. However, getting a cat to lose weight is far more difficult than working with a canine, so you’ll have to put in the extra effort to get your feline back in shape. According to SFGate.com, you should keep the following tips in mind to help your furry friend regain his vitality and get back to a more fit and healthier state.

Take him to the vet
Before you embark on any weight loss plan, you should take a trip to your veterinarian to get blood work done and begin a course of action to help your feline lose weight. This will let you know the ideal weight for your feline, considering size and age, to ultimately ¬†slim down to the perfect proportion. Additionally, this is a good chance to get your feline’s spring vaccinations and other regular tests done to protect against the many seasonal risks.

Make a commitment to regular play
Getting your feline up and moving is one of the most effective means of accelerating heart rate and helping burn calories, but unless you bring your cat on regular walks, you’ll have to get a bit creative. Invest in a few engaging cat toys that make sounds and can pique interest. Hide the toys inside of a paper bag or search for feathery toys that can dangle behind you and can be chased. Avoid products like laser pointers – while it will get him up and moving, they will frustrate your furry friends since they can never be caught!

A change in diet
Upping the nutritional quality of your feline’s food and limiting portion sizes is another effective means of dropping excess weight. Look for products made with mainly natural ingredients and free of corn, grain and other fillers. It may cost a bit extra, but it may just improve your feline’s longevity and overall health.